Technical Remote Viewing University - The Signal Line News Reports
Who Can Learn TRV® ?

By PSI TECH Staff
January 10, 2003

      Technical Remote Viewers come from all walks of life. They are married, single, young, and old. Some are hardworking entrepreneurs, others are gainfully unemployed. TRV'ers are wealthy, poor, realists, and idealists. Some are aligned politically with the right, others with the left. Some have deep religious affiliations, others don't. They are die-hard vegetarians, and die-hard carnivores. Some believe that we as a species are destined for great things in the universe. Others believe we are little more than flotsam floating in a heartless void.

      When the remote viewing military team was operating at Fort Meade, Maryland, a psychologist was hired and tasked to study the team and determine what the criteria was that would make the best remote viewer. They performed test after test, and when the study was through and the report submitted, it was revealed that there are no key recognizable selection criteria. The fact is, anyone can learn how to remote view.

      And PSI TECH has proved that assessment again and again. PSI TECH has trained doctors, aeronautical engineers, homemakers, computer analysts, scientists, CEOs, mechanics, law enforcement professionals, agents, and small business owners. They have trained college students, professors, writers, nurses, artists and musicians. They have trained military personnel, politicians and lawyers. The point is, students of TRV are from many occupations, from all over the world, and have a myriad of interests.

      In this week's issue of The Signal Line, we will highlight the personal experience of one of our students, Joel Salisbury. Joel (better known as "Rio" in the PSI TECH chat room) is a talented artist whose goal is to integrate TRV with his artwork.

      Joel's watercolor paintings have won numerous honors including: First Place Award at the 1999 Masterworks, Second Premium Awards at the 1996 and 1998 New Mexico Watercolor Society Shows, and at the 1994 Albuquerque Fine Arts Gallery Show. Salisbury paints full-time, travelling throughout the Southwest and abroad to conduct studies of his subjects. He resides near Santa Fe, New Mexico, where he also maintains his studio.



Profile Of An Artist And TRV® Student

An Interview With Joel Salisbury

By Jeff Lucas
January 10, 2003

Joel, how long have you been Technical Remote Viewing?

I have been TRVing for about three years. The first sessions I have in my files date back to January, 2000.

When you first heard about TRV training, did the concept of the average person being able to learn how to consistently access accurate psychically derived data sound impossible to you?

It didn't sound impossible. All through history the word "impossible" has been mistakenly assigned to a myriad of things, that later proved to be possible. It is sort of a silly word actually. If one is to apply the notion of impossibility to a concept or to an event, it would be sensible to frame the statement in a temporal context, so as to say, "Such and such appears to be impossible at this time."

So would you say that you were convinced it was real from the start? Or were you skeptical and ordered the course so that you could find out for yourself whether it was real?

I explored the PSI TECH website and I had read what was available at the time related to remote viewing. From this general research it seemed clear that the U.S. government deemed remote viewing to have enough potential for information gathering to support RV research. There seemed to be no question that for nearly twenty years the protocols were applied in accessing intelligence data that was otherwise unavailable. This is to say that yes I thought TRV was real enough. However, I did have some reservations about whether I could learn and apply the skills necessary to remote viewing. After learning what I could in general about the subject, I decided to invest in PSI TECH’s instructional TRV training course to see what more I could learn by "walking the walk."

What motivated you to learn Technical Remote Viewing?

I have a wide ranging curiosity. There are many things which interested me and about which I had no practical means of learning the truth. For example, did Atlantis really exist, was there more than one shooter in the JFK assassination, and was there ever water on Mars. One can find all sorts of speculations related to topics like these, but if there was a means (and my limited research indicated TRV was such a tool) to gain any experiential insight regarding such questions…well, I really wanted to apply myself to learning and implementing those skills. I thought that if I could achieve some kind of reasonable accuracy working practice "blind targets" and after such sessions learn what the cue was to check my "aim"; then with enough experience I could explore targets that were seemingly remote in time and/or space and glean at least some useful, revealing data.

Do you remember the first blind session that you worked that convinced you beyond any doubt that TRV technology really worked?

I do not recall if there was one specific blind session that first gave me the, "Aha! This is for real!" experience. Reflecting on it, it seems to me the personal realization that TRV truly worked came through a series of sessions, as my skills improved. In PSI TECH’s private online training room there was a target of the week years ago that was “The Ark of the Covenant.” I had no idea what the target was when I did it and posted my session. But when I found out what it was, I was amazed! I had no doubt in my mind that I was bang on the signal line (i.e. on target!) I guess that was the session, which convinced me it was possible to get hard evidence about things otherwise inaccessible to the physical senses. I was amazed! I was amazed at the TRV process. I was able to “lock on” in the blind and describe an unknown target, using only a set of eight random generated numbers. But more astounding to me was that the session left me with an inner certainty that the Ark still exists (this was another thing I had been curious about for years). The data also indicated it is well hidden and intricately protected.

Had you ever had a previous psychic experience prior your TRV training?

Through the course of my life I have had a number of experiences that I think were psychic in nature: I’ve had some precognitive dreams and an 'inner voice' that seems to warn me of imminent danger. In fact, that experience did occur one time that heads-up saved me from great bodily harm. It is my perception that many people have a sprinkling of these seemingly paranormal incidents in their lives. I suspect this is more widespread than we generally realize. I don't feel that I am a "psychic," but I do think we all have perceptual organs that range out well beyond the reach of our usual physical senses and that we are occasionally protected from harm or proffered important information by these "PSI senses". I have found that once the subject is opened up, many people have personal stories to share that support this model of reality.

Did the subject of psi and psychic functioning always interest you, or had you not given it much thought prior to hearing about TRV?

I have been interested in psi and related subjects since I was about fourteen, so the topic of remote viewing was a continuation of a long standing interest. Of course the thing that differs TRV from my previous interests in psi was that TRV offered a means of learning how to remotely perceive events, people, or things. The chance to do some experiential learning was what really got me stoked about TRV.

How long did it take you to effectively master the basic and intermediate techniques?

My recollection is that between six to nine months I felt I was getting the knack of reflexively staying in structure by that time.

Are you currently studying or do you plan on learning and pursuing TRV further?

Yes I am currently studying and gradually applying the advanced TRV techniques at TRV University. Clearly, this is a learning curve that can be pursued and refined for years. Imagine, the movement of doing a deep mind probe on an unknown person and then consider how challenging it is to thoroughly penetrate and understand one's own subconscious mind (yes, I know no one "owns" the subconscious.) To really understand the impulses driving another human, a TRVer might execute many sessions, each containing numerous exploratory movements. Further, it takes time and diligence to refine one's own sensibilities related to the rubrics of human psychology. The practice of TRV is certainly a discipline that can be followed and refined for a lifetime.

What do you hope to accomplish with your new skill level?

One of my aims is to dovetail TRV with my artwork. To date, this has happened mostly as a peripheral effect of my remote viewing practice. It is my intention to apply more conscious direction in using TRV as an actual source of inspiration. It is my hope that I will eventually be able to do paintings as a sort of Idea Template to explore the particulars of significant targets. I feel this is already in the works on a subconscious level, but I am still considering how to make it a conscious process. There are several pieces I have done that I believe are product of my experience with TRV and a sort residual connection to the Matrix that continues even when one isn't actually "in session." (I have attached some images of these TRV related works and the Phi Pod images on my website are also of this genre.)

Have you met any other TRVers during the course of your studying the skill, and has the interaction with them helped you in any way?

Yes I have met a several other TRVers in person and a number I know only through the chat room hosted by PSI TECH. But all in general are helpful, caring, and intelligent people. I am always learning from these people, mostly through review of their various posted sessions, although there is one person that occasionally prods me when my structure goes ragged.

Do you trade targets with the other students?

I have traded targets with several other PSI TECH TRVers. Mostly these have been Optimum Trajectory, (i.e. Optimum Life Path) sessions. Also, I have asked other TRVers to do blind sessions related to how I might best integrate remote viewing with my artwork. These sessions that others have done for me have been very helpful.

What is the most memorable TRV session you have ever worked?

A few years ago I attended a workshop sponsored by PSI TECH in Mesquite Nevada. Joni Dourif , the President of PSI TECH, monitored TRV sessions with several students as demos. I was one of the people that did a session. The cue was 'blind' to me but the other students in the workshop knew the target cue. As the session progressed I began to feel I was being thrown a curve ball, so to speak. Like there was some joke or prank being played on me. There were many emotions in the target area and I was unable to sort them out. The target was a human male and I got that he was seated in room and there were other people present. He seemed cold and calculating, like a strategist, although not malevolent or malicious. By this time I was utterly rattled from the session, had a sense I was in two places at once, and I had reasonably sketched the room we all were in. I have to say all that rocked my sense of reality. What was even more confusing was I had the sense that I 'knew 'the target person.' When the target was revealed, I found out that it was me! The target was actually me as I would be on my optimum life path!

It was at around this time one of the attendees, who knew when my flight was to leave Las Vegas, mentioned that I had better leave the workshop soon if I was to catch my flight. I gathered up the pages of my session, said quick goodbyes to everyone, sprinted to the car and headed back to Las Vegas at well over the speed limit. When I relaxed enough a bit I realized that I still didn't feel like I was all in one place. When I neared the airport I looked for the map to return the rental car and discovered I had left the map at the hotel. It was dark, I was in an unfamiliar city looking for a rental car lot in a dark, deserted nether world of commercial buildings, and feeling frantic. I passed a side street and something inside me empathically said, "Stop! Turn around and go down that street." By this time I was hoping to find a pay phone so I could call for directions. I turned around and drove down the side street looking from side to side for a phone or any building that might be open. All was deserted. I went for a least a half mile like this, very frustrated and banging the steering wheel. Then on the right, mostly obscured by a tall building I saw some lights…when I could get a clear view I was shocked at what I saw. It was the rental lot! I had the sense that I was still bi-located, in the RV mindset and that was how I had found my way! I was amazed at how this had happened. That was definitely my most memorable TRV session.

Since learning TRV, have you become more aware of anything in your everyday life or within yourself?

On the whole, since learning to TRV the world, the universe seems more mysterious and marvelous. Reality seems multidimensional and it invites exploration.

Have you told any family members or friends about TRV, and have they been understanding and accepting of your new skill? Have any of them learned it after being introduced to it by you?

I have told my friends and family about TRV. Some are interested enough to ask questions occasionally. I think that the potentials of remote viewing are so far outside the perimeters of what most people consider as possible, that they don't know what to ask or say about the subject.

I've seen some of your beautiful artwork. You are very talented. How long have you been painting and sculpting?

Thanks for the compliment. I remember spending a lot of time drawing when I was six. A neighbor noticed and gave me a ream of large yellow paper. Then I really got going. I took up oil painting at twelve and began lessons with a portrait artist about a year after that. Curiously, I had a preoccupation with drawing and painting clipper ships, from when I was in first grade all the way through high school. This was odd since I was born and spent my childhood in Colorado. I never saw the ocean until I was nineteen. All of the oil paintings I did of square riggers in high school sold right away. I guess I got it out of my system, as I have never painted another ship since I graduated from high school.

It was in 11th grade that I started trying my hand with sculpture. I get rather compulsive when I sculpt, perhaps because the body is involved in a more kinesthetic way than it is with painting. Each day I have difficulty stopping work when I have a sculpture going. It seems to be a totally engaging activity for me. I tend to be much more casual in my process regarding painting. I went on to study fine arts in college. I continued drawing and painting some while I was in the service, but space was a big limitation. In my adult life since, interests and circumstances have gotten me into other areas of creative expression. When I first arrived in Santa Fe in 1971 I took up construction carpentry to make steady money. That led to opening a woodshop where I used to design and build furniture. After my wife and I moved out of town I got into forging architectural hardware for a time and that evolved into doing custom cutlery for about three years. Also, I taught school for a couple of years. So I have taken the scenic route in a way. But now I have traveled round the circle and returned to painting full time, excepting when projects around the house or studio require I take up a hammer or shovel.

When you are in the process of creating art, is there much left brain thinking occurring, or does it seem sometimes like you are receiving information or inspiration from an unconscious or universal source?

Often I get insights into my own process by observing my finished artwork over time. Occasionally some pieces have been a sort of precognitive statement as well, realized only after the fact, so to speak.

What is the most significant change in your life that has occurred as a result of learning TRV?

There are two significant changes that have occurred in my life. One is that I now tend to look at so-called reality in terms of "models." What I mean by this is various models accurately describe certain aspects of experience or perception in some circumstances, but not in others. It seems an all too human inclination to grow attached to one model of how "things really are" and to deny or discard all other alternative models. The light as wave/light as particle contradiction comes to mind. In one experimental construction light can be demonstrated to behave as a wave. In another experimental apparatus light can be proved to consist of discrete particles. How can both of these seemingly contradictory states be true regarding the essential nature of light? To my knowledge, physics has not explained this conundrum. Rather, physicists adopt the wave model of light when that is appropriate, or switch, referring to the particle model if the context requires that. The point being, I am more inclined to look for models that help explain my experience and perception, rather than to attempt to forge all experience into a form that will fit into a single model that I imagine to 'explain all that is'.

Another important change has to do with becoming accustomed to living with other seeming contradictions. There is the notion in physics of "non-locality" and in mysticism it might be called the "eternal present". The nature of the concept of non-locality declares that our ideas and experience of space/time are in essence, illusory, that these two pillars of physical manifestation are not at all the absolute limitations we imagine them to be. In terms of the remote viewer's experience, space/time does not seem to limit at all! When one undertakes to learn the TRV techniques and demonstrates that it is possible to perceive an event that transpired years ago in some far place, this verifies, at least in a personal, experiential sense that non-locality supercedes our unquestioning commitment to the idea that space and time are the absolute proof of humanity as individual "particles", separated from each other and from everything in the reality field. Without the space/time discriminator the human experience seems much more like a continuous wave, or maybe even some cosmic mobius loop. This is a contradiction that flies in the face of the testimony of our senses. This is a paradox that practitioners of TRV must learn to live with.

For more information on Joel Salisbury, we invite you to visit his web site located at www.joelsalisbury.com.


Related Articles & Links
Practical Applications Of TRV
My Last "I Bet You Can't Remote View it" Bet!
Reader Letters
TRV Questions & Answers
Cuing TRV Targets
TRV University
History Helped Shape The Future of Remote Viewing
Imagine If You Could Do This
Video Presentations
Introduction to TRV
TRV Questions & Answers
TRV Demonstration



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